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HIV/AIDS Prevention in “Indian Country”: Current Practice, Indigenist Etiology Models, and Postcolonial Approaches to Change

Many tribal and urban American Indians and Alaska Native communities have initiated HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment services. The richness, depth, and scope of these efforts, however, are not well known and have not been sufficiently documented in the academic literature. In this article we assess the strengths and weakness of the published literature using the constructs of the socioecological framework. We discuss the need to apply an “indigenist” etiology paradigm to HIV/AIDS risk and protection. Finally, we define and discuss the varied postcolonial approaches to HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and healing.

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